WordLog

A weblog authored by Carthik about the latest in the WordPress world.

Thursday, September 23, 2004

HeadSpace – Kurbick Based Custom Design

Filed under: — Carthik @ 1:45 am

I see the first of the Kubrick based designs.

This one’s called HeadSpace.

I hope there are more base themes, like Kubrick, and more customizations of the themes in the future. Designers should get a shot in the arm with the new template-based design option in the forthcoming release of WordPress.

11 Comments

  1. err the second link points to the same location as the first one….

    Comment by Anonymous — 9/23/2004 @ 2:05 am

  2. Fixed! Thanks. That was what I like to call a Ctrl+C – Ctrl+V problem.

    Comment by Carthik — 9/23/2004 @ 2:20 am

  3. ‘A shot in the arm for designers’? You mean with a gun? Seriously, this new theming system looks a lot more involved than the one-file templates I’m churning out at the moment, and if I wanted to pursue it I’d basically have to abandon making templates for other tools and devote myself to Wordpress. If the majority of my users were coming from Wordpress it might be worth doing, but that’s not the case.

    Hopefully you have enough talented designers within Wordpress to produce a good variety of themes. Classy as Kubrick is, I’d hate to see every new Wordpress blog looking exactly the same :)

    Comment by the absent student — 9/23/2004 @ 1:29 pm

  4. ..for designers..
    So there is the implicit assumption in the statement that it is the designers (those who pursue graphic and html design as a career/serious hobby) who’ll get some encouragement.
    One-file templates will continue to work fine.

    A theme is a useful thing to have, in my opinion, they extend the possibilities beyond just the stylesheet.

    Comment by Carthik — 9/23/2004 @ 1:44 pm

  5. Oh, it wasn’t clear you didn’t want non-professionals getting involved in the creation of Wordpress templates. Sorry, my mistake.

    In my experience, professional web designers tend to concentrate their efforts on the stuff they get paid for. I hope Wordpress can afford them.

    Comment by the absent student — 9/23/2004 @ 7:34 pm

  6. Dear Absent Student,
    Please do not feel so negatively about something that is new, which may be better (in my opinion) or worse (as you may be thinking the new system is).
    In any case, Please do not try to read things I did not say into my words. To be specific :
    >>it wasn’t clear you didn’t want non-professionals getting involved in the creation of Wordpress templates. Sorry, my mistake.

    The reason it wasn’t clear perhaps was because I never meant it.

    >>In my experience, professional web designers tend to concentrate their efforts on the stuff they get paid for. I hope Wordpress can afford them.

    Not neccasarily, and you forget I mentioned serious hobbyists.

    I don’t mean to split hair fine but I’d suggest you refine and moderate what you have to say, according to what has already been said. I am sure I haven’t said anything to have provoked you, or make you feel negatively about things, so please return the favour :)

    Thank you.

    Comment by Carthik — 9/24/2004 @ 12:42 am

  7. How would you define ’serious hobbyists’? I’ve had a site devoted to blog templates since January 2002, so I’d be interested to know how much longer I have to go before I can be considered ’serious’. (Of course, since my core audience is teenage girls and twentysomething women it’s unlikely ever to happen. I can live with that.)

    There was the implicit assumption in your reply that I wasn’t a designer and the changes were aimed at those who were. I accept it was unintentional, but I hope you can see why I might have taken offence at that.

    Comment by the absent student — 9/24/2004 @ 10:04 am

  8. First off, I am sorry if I offended you. One thing wordpress cannot afford to lose is designers like you (and yes, I imply that you are a designer, and a serious hobbyist). I guess that is the reason why the old methods will not be shown the door! I am sure that as time passes and more themes and customizations of the themes are available, there will be more we can all learn from it, till the time were we can design our own themes and designs.

    I never intended to say you are not a designer. To clarify further, I was talking there about people who create custom designs that extend far beyond just the css stylesheet aspect – that includes custom images, and possibly custom code components too. The end result of such design would be a custom-created blog.

    I will do the best I can to keep users and designers updated with the latest in WordPress design, so everyone can learn and improve, and everyone can utilize the power of advanced design-enabling tools and methods.

    Comment by Carthik — 9/24/2004 @ 10:50 am

  9. I consider myself a designer too, but not because I get paid for it on occasion (on less occasions than I’d like, truth be told). But because I am very interested in the art of proper CSS and HTML combined with elegant graphics and layout. Which I guess would then make me a serious hobbyist instead.

    I have a day job, as well (thankfully so, since my web design work as it is now won’t pay the kind of bills I have), but in my spare time, I love to create things, even if I have no one to create them for, hence my blog with close to 30 different skins to choose from.

    My fervent hope is that my designs become know to the WP community the way they are in the MT and Blogger community so that when someone is thinking about forking over the dough for a design, they will think of me — or you, or Sekimori, or Maystar, or Blog Moxie. The point is, if cranking out designs and working with the various templates and innuis of MT, WP etc. becomes too easy for the novice, where will their motivation be to hire someone to do that which is beyond their scope? Make it childs-play and the children will play. Where will that leave the others? I guess if you’re good enough, you can demand a king’s ransom and get it. But for the clientele I cultivate (the blogging crowd and small to medium size businesses), those megabucks just aren’t out there. So I’m competing with every idiot out there with a bootleg copy of Frontpage and Photoshop.

    Carthik, please hold my drink while I climb down off my soapbox.

    Joni
    http://www.webjones.org

    Comment by Joni — 10/5/2004 @ 5:56 pm

  10. Joni – that is the great dilemma for the pro who is nevertheless in the open source community. How and where to draw the line ?

    Comment by Root — 10/8/2004 @ 9:40 pm

  11. There was the implicit assumption in your reply that I wasn’t a designer and the changes were aimed at those who were. I accept it was unintentional, but I hope you can see why I might have taken offence at that.

    Comment by Walidov — 7/31/2007 @ 12:48 am

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